FIGT ANZA Authors Panel Event

For this special September event, FIGT ANZA, Australia and New Zealand is joined by six amazing authors based/born in Australia and New Zealand. They are all active FIGT members and with their work, they bring their unique perspective on topics related to globally mobile life. Their experiences cover both personal and professional aspects of their life across cultures.We would love you to participate in this interactive conversation with our guest speakers.

See event page for Speaker bios and to register. 

International music project: A Summer’s Dream by Kaori Mukai

I have zero musical talent. So it’s been great fun to get to help Kaori Mukai shape the lyrics to her new single ‘A Summer’s Dream’.

NEW SINGLE – A SUMMER’S DREAM by Kaori Mukai! With the afterglow of summer in the air, just keep driving past the city lights chasing the warm breeze in the night. A new song for those who wish summer never ends.

Kaori is a Japanese singer but I met her at a small Japanese restaurant in Jakarta, Indonesia a few years ago. She was the opening act for Hiroaki Kato, another awesome bilingual Japanese and Indonesian musician who I got to know, and was warming up for later that evening. I fell in love with her voice.

Kaori was living as an expat in Indonesia at the time. I loved the way she collaborated so closely with Indonesians and other musicians like Hiroaki who were genuine about wanting to engage across culture. She even put a jazz spin to the Doraemon song and sang it in Indonesian.

As someone who is mixed Indonesian and Japanese, I had grown up feeling as though Japan looked down on Indonesia. So, Kaori and her friends’ cross cultural, trilingual engagement (Japanese, Indonesian & English) between Indonesia and Japan spoke deeply to me.

And this time, I’m thrilled to get to participate in one of her projects even though I can’t sing for the life of me!

‘A Summer’s Dream’ by Kaori Mukai – Lyrics Video

A Summer’s Dream is an international, collaborative project between Japanese and Indonesian musicians. It’s got a Japanese City Pop feel to it and was created with those of us who wish summer never ends. Enjoy!

? Digital Single ▶ here

? Kaori MUKAI – A Summer’s Dream (Lyrics Video) ▶ On YouTube here

Music by Kaori Mukai
Lyrics by Kaori Mukai, Danau Tanu
Arranged by Roberto J., Kaori Mukai
Mixed & Mastered by Hisao Sasaki
Kaori Mukai (Vo.), Roberto J. (Pf.), Iwa-chan (Gt.), Yusuke Watanabe (Ba.), Dion Subiakto (Drs.)
Designed by @mongucci

Diversity & Third Culture Kids

Australian Map of Country
Acknowledgment of Country

Resources

READ

Third Culture Kids: Growing Up Among Worlds, 3rd Edition – Pollock, Van Reken & Pollock 2017

Safe Passage – Doug Ota 2014. See also Safe Passage Across Networks

Growing Up in Transit: The Politics of Belonging – Danau Tanu 2018

LISTEN

Third Culture Stories – a podcast by TCKs of Asia. Three of the episodes discusses the impact of structural racism on language and identity.
+ Season 1, Episode 3: Language & Power is an interview with an adult Korean child of a diplomat and her experience of internalized racism as a result of international schooling.
+ Season 2, Episode 1: A Foreigner in My Own Family: The Hidden Loss of Language & Intimacy focuses on the stories of three adult ‘Third Culture Kids’ and their experiences of losing their parents language and/or efforts to maintain it, as well as the deep impact it has had on their sense of identity and relationship with their family.
+ Season 3, Episode 3: Mixed Loyalties focuses on the deeper impact that structural racism and language has on identity.

The Traumatizing Gift: a Global Childhood – A TEDx Fullbright Tokyo talk by Saeko Mizuta. Saeko is CEO of the TCK Workshop (日本語), an online tutoring service for bilingual children (Japanese and English).

READ & LISTEN

Translanguaging Guides by City University of New York (CUNY)

Breakout Part 1

Q1. Describe a time when you felt seen by a teacher or any adult. Why did you feel seen? 

Q2. Describe a time when you did not feel seen by a teacher or any adult. Why did you not feel seen? 

ACTIVE LISTENING

Neutral, no judgment
Be attentive (nod, etc), patient (don’t fill silences)

Reflect back what they said. Use their words as much as possible. Do not interpret. Do not add your opinion. 

3min storytelling + 2 min retelling each.

Breakout Part 2

Q. Describe one or two areas where you lack privilege. How has this affected you and how others interact with you? How does it affect the way you teach and/or interact with students?

Discussion

Q1. Describe one or two areas where you have privilege. How might this affect how you see students? How you teach?  

Q2. Identify and describe an example of a negative narrative that is being told about students at your school. In what way are students being blamed for it? In what way are the staff contributing to the “problem” or acting as gatekeepers?

Q3. Compare the two maps of Australia (here and here). They tell stories from two different perspectives. The first map represents the dominant narrative told of Australia and is more widely known. The second map tells a story that is often missing from the dominant narrative. Can you identify the dominant narrative told in your subject curriculum or textbooks? What are the stories that are missing from the curriculum or textbooks you use?

Feedback form

It would be greatly appreciated if you could fill in the feedback form here. Thank you!

Extra resources

  • Misunderstood – Tanya Crossman
  • Books on Third Culture Kids and expat living as recommended by the Families in Global Transition, which was co-founded by Ruth Van Reken
  • Heidi Tunberg’s pinterest boards feature an extensive collection of books and other resources relating to Third Culture Kids and their families. See also Heidi’s board for TCKs: Asian Third Culture Kids
THE STRENGTH OF WEAK TIES
Original study

Granovetter, Mark. 1973. “The Strength of Weak Ties,” American Journal of Sociology (78:6), 1360-1380.

For well-being

Gillian Sandstrom’s research

Leslie, Ian. 2020. “Why your ‘weak-tie’ friendships may mean more than you think.” In BBC (July 3).  

For recruitment

Weak Ties Matter

How the Best Bosses Interrupt Bias on Their Teams (via Joel Laban)

Mixed Loyalties: When Choosing is Difficult – hosted by TCKs of Asia

Poster. Mixed Loyalties: When Choosing is Difficult

Recently, I told a group of educators that international schools often force their students to choose between either ‘being international’ or their home culture as though they cannot be both. When students choose to speak in a language other than English, they are criticised for not being international.

This approach seems to assume that there is only one way of being international. But … doesn’t that contradict the whole idea of inter-national? Why can’t students be both ‘international’ and Indonesian or Korean?

More importantly, how does this forced choice affect children at a deeper, emotional level?

What happens when a child feels as though they must choose between a more powerful identity (e.g. English-speaking, westernised version of being international) and a less powerful identity that connects them with people who mean the world to them, such as their parents? What happens when choosing a more powerful identity leaves a child feeling as though they are betraying their less powerful identity?

Join us for an open forum hosted by TCKs of Asia on Friday, July 2 to listen to a few international school alumni and other adult TCKs speak about their personal experience of facing these internal conflicts and to discuss its implications together.

Event details

Friday, 2 July 2021

6am Los Angeles – 9am New York & Santiago – 2pm Lagos & London – 4pm Beirut – 6pm Islamabad – 9pm Singapore & Perth – 10pm Seoul & Tokyo

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

Growing Up in Transit on Your Campus – Resources for the AIELOC Summer Institute

Main reading

Growing Up in Transit: The Politics of Belonging at an International School (Berghahn Books, 2020)

The Educator & Self-Reflexivity

Breakout Questions

Q1. Describe a time when you felt seen by a teacher or any adult. Why did you feel seen?

Q2. Describe a time when you did not feel seen by a teacher or any adult. Why did you not feel seen?

Q3. Describe the privileges that you have and don’t have. How might it impact your interaction with students?

Acknowledgment

Some of the design of this section (especially the active listening exercise in the breakout session) was inspired by Jessica Wei Huang‘s design of an Asian Pacific Islander (API) Educators Community Support meeting that she co-facilitated for AIELOC.

The School & The Narratives

Parker, Lyn. 2003. From Subjects to Citizens: Balinese Villagers in the Indonesian Nation-State. London: Routledge.

Anderson, Benedict. 1983. Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. Verso Books.

Willis, Paul. 1977. Learning to Labor: How Working Class Kids Get Working Class Jobs. Columbia University Press.

Meyer, Heather. 2021. The Global Imaginary of International School Communities. Palgrave Macmillan.

Breakout Questions

Q1. a) Identify and describe an example of a negative narrative that is being told about students at your school. In what way are students being blamed for it? In what way are the staff contributing to the “problem” or acting as gatekeepers? 
b) Discuss with each other how teachers and administrators can model a solution for the students.

Q2. Have you ever experienced the type of intercultural discomfort that was mentioned in the presentation? Share an example and discuss what you or the school can do to address it. 

The Student & the Hidden Curriculum

Tanu, Danau. 2021. The Hidden Curriculum

Decolonising math by Ecolint (International School of Geneva)

Language & Power by TCKs of Asia – on structural racism in international schools & internalised racism. There is a link to the recording on the page.

The Strength of Weak Ties
Original study

Granovetter, Mark. 1973. “The Strength of Weak Ties,” American Journal of Sociology (78:6), 1360-1380.

For well-being

Gillian Sandstrom’s research

Leslie, Ian. 2020. “Why your ‘weak-tie’ friendships may mean more than you think.” In BBC (July 3).  

For recruitment

Weak Ties Matter

How the Best Bosses Interrupt Bias on Their Teams (via Joel Laban)

Breakout questions

Q1. Describe an example of a hidden curriculum or bias in the curriculum taught at your school. Discuss ways to address the bias or to decolonize it.  

Q2. Discuss ways you or your school can learn more about your students’ perspectives.

Q3. Discuss ways to engage parents.

Intergenerational Cultural Gap

Videos created by the International School of Dalat for parents to watch before they enrol their children at the school. See ‘School Culture Videos’ in the right hand column.

Third Culture Kids & Family Ties & A Foreigner in My Own Family: The Hidden Loss of Language & Intimacy by TCKs of Asia. There is a link to the recordings on the respective page.

Other resources

Japanese TCKs on their experiences of learning in a second language – A short video by two Japanese TCKs on what adults did to help them feel ‘seen’ even when they couldn’t speak English.

Third Culture Stories – a podcast by TCKs of Asia.

Identity-Centered Learning by Daniel Wickner